1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S

1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S
1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S

1865 CIVIL War History Set Illustrated Union Confederate Military Army Navy U. S

A HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR IN THE UNITED STATES; With a Preliminary View of Its Causes and Biographical Sketches of Its Heroes. Part First Published in 1863 by Bradley & Co. Philadelphia; Part Second Published in 1864 by Bradley & Co.

Philadelphia, Jones Brothers & Co. Baltimore; Part Third Published in 1865 by Jones Brothers, Philadelphia, C. Three 9 x 6 red leather bindings decorated with gilt. Illustrated with engraved plate, also illustrations and maps. Condition: VERY GOOD ANTIQUE CONDITION. Beautiful red-leather exteriors decorated with gilt as shown in photos. Volume III has a missing bottom corner on the rear board but does not affect display (see photos) and there is a publishers error in the lettering beneath the eagle on the spine (see photo in main description).

All three volumes are firmly bound. Text is clean and complete, typical foxing. No torn, loose or missing pages. A superior example of this very hard to find complete wartime set. This rare three-volume history of the Civil War, beautifully bound in red leather decorated with gilt, was written in installments as the war progressed.

Part First appeared in 1863, and Part Second in 1864. The original author, Samuel M. Schmucker, died in 1863, before the war had concluded.

Thus, Part Third, issued in 1865, was completed by Dr. Brockett (author of Womans Work in the Civil War and others) and issued by a different publisher. The text is illustrated by a series of beautiful steel-engraved plates, other illustrations and maps. The Publisher states in the Preface. There can be little doubt that a reliable history of the incidents connected with this memorable drama, and even more than one such history, would be acceptable to the public.

In the following work, therefore, the writer has undertaken to describe its thrilling and marvellous scenes. He has set forth at some length the most potent of the causes which gave it birth. He has introduced, from time to time, biographical sketches of those soldiers and statesmen, who distinguished themselves by their heroism or by their patriotism during its progress. He has followed the march of the Federal armies, as they achieved one victory or suffered one temporary reverse after another; and the narrative will be continued, Deo volente, until the record is complete, and he has described how the Republic was conducted by firm and skillful hands through all the storms which have assailed it, to the attainment of a permanent and honorable peace. The author has been assiduous and careful in regard to the materials from which the contents of the work have been derived. He has applied to his use every attainable source of information which was worthy of confidence and attention. Official reports of eminent commanders, and the narratives of intelligent and truthful eye-witnesses of the scenes described, together with various other depositories of facts, have been thoroughly examined, compared and appropriated. The author has not the presumption to imagine that he has in all cases attained perfect accuracy ; but he does not hesitate to assert, that he has left no effort or expedient unemployed to avoid error and misstatement in every part of the work. The Contents are described in detail below. Some of the historic illustrations can be viewed further down the page. I hope youll take a moment to have a look. INTRODUCTION: Origin of the Southern Rebellion Classification of its several Causes The Act of 1816 respecting a Tariff Agency of Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams Position of John 0. Calhoun He first conceives his project of Nullification His Memorial to Governor Hamilton The operation of a high Tariff The Legislature of South Carolina Outbreak of the Nullification Movement Vigorous measures of President Jackson Mr. Calhoun in the United States Senate A memorable Debate Final settlement of the difficulty American Slavery Its origin The proposition of Thomas Jefferson Slavery in the Territories The compact of 1787 Compromise of Henry Clay Annexation of Texas The Wilmot Proviso Compromise of 1850 Slavery in Kansas Rise of the Republican Party Its Principles and Policy Administration of James Buchanan Treason in the Federal Cabinet Preliminary operations of the Conspirators Policy of Mr. Buchanan respecting Secession Presidential Campaign of 1860 Election of Mr.

Lincoln The Doctrine of State Sovereignty as opposed to Federal Centralization. CHAPTER ONE: Effect of Mr.

Lincoln's Election in the South Political Movements in South Carolina and Georgia Excitement in Charleston Preliminary Acts and Events Resignation of Federal Officers Election of Members to the State Convention Opponents of Secession Federal Property seized in Charleston Conventions summoned in Georgia and Alabama Assembling of the Convention of South Carolina The First Act of Secession from the Union passed A pathetic statement of Grievances Reflections on the Result Popular Feelings in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida. CHAPTER TWO: Treasonable Proclamation of Governor Pickens Resignation of the Representatives of South Carolina in Congress The Crittenden Propositions of Compromise Their Provisions Scramble for Federal Property Commissioners of South Carolina to the Federal Government Major Anderson The removal of his Command to Fort Sumter Mr, Secretary Floyd His Resignation The Convention of the Slave-holding States Important Events at Savannah Secession of Mississippi Pernicious influence of Jefferson Davis Resignation of his Seat in the United States Senate The Secession of Alabama Of Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas.

CHAPTER THREE: Various efforts made for Compromise and Settlement Conciliatory meetings held in the Northern States Their Ultimate Failure Apostacy of Alexander H. Stephens Resignation of the Southern Representatives in the Federal Congress The Rebel Congress Convened at Montgomery Its Organization Adoption of a Provisional Constitution The Organization of the Southern Confederacy Jefferson Davis elected President Biographical Sketches of Jefferson Davis, of Stephens, of the Cabinet Ministers of the Southern Confederacy, Memminger, Toombs, Mallory, Walker, Benjamin. CHAPTER FOUR: Assembling of the Peace Congress at Washington Proposals of Compromise Attitude of President Buchanan Public Sentiment respecting Fort Sumter Mission of-the " Star of -the West" Establishment of the Confederate Government at Montgomery Inauguration of Jefferson Davis as President Inauguration of President Lincoln His Address The famous Oration of A. Stephens at Savannah Its historical importance His First Position He refutes Jefferson, Hamilton, and Madison His Second Position The foundation stone of the Southern Confederacy.

CHAPTER FIVE: The Mission of Mr. Yancey and his Associates to Europe Their Representations to the French and English People The Rebel Commissioners at Washington Their absurd deportment General Beauregard demands the neetmok Surrender of Fort Sumter Preparations for the Bombardment of the Fort Size and Strength of the Works Sketch of Major Anderson Sketch of General Beauregard Commencement of the Bombardment Incidents of the first Day's attack Events of the ensuing Night'J'he continuance of the Bombardment during the next Day Sufferings of the Garrison Deputation from General Beauregard Propositions of Surrender They are accepted by Major Anderson Why the Garrison was not reinforced Proclamation of Governor Letcher Proclamation of President Lincoln.

CHAPTER SIX: Enthusiasm of the Rebel States Projected Conquest of Washington Proofs that it was contemplated Seventy-five thousand troops ordered out Davis issues Letters of Marque and Reprisal Secession of Virginia Blockade of the Southern Ports Aspect of the Loyal States The Attack of Federal Troops in Baltimore Fury of the Rebel Mob Results of the Attack The Federal Forts are Garrisoned Secession of Missouri The Chicago Zouaves The Gallant Ellsworth Origin of the term Zonave History of the French Zouaves in the Algeria, in the Crimea, in Italy Their Peculiar Characteristics. CHAPTER SEVEN: Secession of Tennessee Parson Brownlow Declaration of War by the Confederate Congress Skirmish near St.

Louis Secession element in Baltimore Fort McHeiiry Secession of North Carolina Adjournment of the Rebel Congress to convene at Richmond Assembly of Federal Troops at Washington The Occupation of Alexandria Assassination of Colonel Ellsworth Sketch of his Career Famous Tour of the Chicago Zouaves Ellsworth's Military tastes and talents His personal appearance and characteristics His peculiarities as a speaker He organizes the New York Fire Zouaves General Robert Patterson's Campaign in Virginia Crossing the Potomac at Williamsport Battle of Falling Waters Pursuit of the Enemy The March to Bunker Hill To Charlestown Occupation of Harper's Ferry. CHAPTER EIGHT: The encounters with the Rebel Troops at Fairfax Court House, at Acquia Creek, at Romney, at Philippi Gallantry of Colonel Kelley Battle of Great Bethel Causes of the disaster Dohertys description Death of Lieutenant Greble Sketch of his Career Union sentiment in Western Virginia The New State of Kanawha Harper's Ferry devastated by the Rebels The Ohio troops fired on near Yienna Operations of General McClellan in Western Virginia His admirable plans The Battle of Rich Mountain Colonel Rosecranz Results of the engagement Sketch of General McClellan His Reconnoissance of the Cascade Mountains His secret mission to the West Indies His journey to the Crimea His official report as Commissioner His subsequent movements He becomes Commander of the Department of Ohio. CHAPTER NINE: Extraordinary Session of Congress in July. 1861 Message of President Lincoln Sketch of'i'haddeus Stevens His Political Career His action as Chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means Important Bills passed by Congress Messrs. Yallaudigham and Burnett The civil war in Missouri The Grand Army equipped at Washington Order given to General McDowell to advance toward Manassas Arrangement of theArmy The advance reach Bull Run The Preliminary conflict at that place Position of the Rebel Army at Manassas General Beauregard The impending contest. CHAPTER ELEVEN: The impression produced on the public by the battle of Manassas Various causes of the Federal Defeat The preceding March Inferiority of numbers Effect of Masked Batteries Incompetent officers Remote position of the Reserves Pernicious presence of Spectators The Coup-de-grace Arrival of General Johnston's troops on the field Was the Defeat in reality a misfortune to the Union Its immediate effects Its influence on the Army Its influence on the Administration It was the cause of subsequent success to the Federal Forces. CHAPTER TWELVE: Increased energy of the Federal Government Events in Missouri Important battle at Carthage Retrograde Movement of General Lyon to Springfield Pursuit of the Rebels under Generals McCulloch and Price Condition of their army The great Battle of Springfield Temporary success of the Rebels Incidents of the Contest Heroism of General Lyon His last effort against the enemy Its success General Lyon's death Results of the Battle Sketch of General Lyon General Fremont made Commandant of the Department of Missouri His Anti-slavery Proclamation It is modified by President Lincoln. CHAPTER THIRTEEN: Expedition against the Rebel Forts The forces appropriated to this enterprise Sailing of the Expedition The Bombardment The surrender of the Forts Commodore Barron Commodore Stringham Results of the victory at Hatteras Operations of Rosecranz Battle at Carnifex Ferry Defeat and flight of Floyd Results of the Victory Events in Missouri Colonel Mulligan's forces at Lexington Incidents of the Battle of Lexington Surrender of Colonel Mulligan Sketch of his Career Battle at Bolivar The Battle of Balls Bluff Incidents of the Engagement Defeat and rout of the Federal troops Death of Colonel Baker National sorrow at his Fate Sketch of his remarkable Career. CHAPTER FOURTEEN: Peculiarities of the War against Secession Federal Expedition Commodore Dupont and General Sherman Its departure from Annapolis Its destination Terrible storm near Cape Hatteras The Expedition reaches Port Royal Rebel forts on Bay Point and Hilton Head Incidents of the attack Surrender of the Forts Results of the Engagement Naval disaster below New Orleans Events in Missouri Bold achievement of Colonel Zagonyi near Springfield The Battle of Belmont Its results Dismissal of General Fremont from his Department of the West Causes of his removal His admirable demeanor on this occasion His subsequent appointment as commander of the Mountain Department. CHAPTER FIFTEEN: European recognition of the Southern Confederacy Mission of Messrs. Mason and Slidell Their arrest Legality of that Arrest The British Government demand them Reasons of their surrender Diplomatic note of Mr. Seward on the subject The Battle of Drainsville Incidents of the engagement General McCall Sketch of his Career Dismissal of Mr. Cameron from the Federal Cabinet The War in Kentucky The Battle of Mill-Springs Incidents of the Conflict Death of General Felix Zollicoffer His character Results of the Battle of Mill-Springs. CHAPTER SIXTEEN: The Burnside Expedition Its departure from Annapolis Another gale off Cape Hatteras Loss of the steamer City of New York The Expedition enters Pamlico Sound It steers for Roanoke Island Rebel Works erected on that Island The Federal troops disembark Incidents of the engagement Defeat and flight of the Rebels Capture of their Forts Results of the victory Death of Colonel De Montueil Sketch of General Burnside Attack on Fort Henry Strength of the Fort Incidents of the Bombardment Surrender of the Rebel Works Loss on both sides Skill and heroism of Commodore Foote Sketch of his Career.

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: Position and strength of Fort Donelson General Grant and Commodore Foote prepare to attack it Repulse of the Gun-boats The assault from the land side Proposition of General Buckner to surrender The capitulation of the Fort Results and trophies of the Conquest Sketch of Ulysses S. Grant Sketch of General Charles Ferguson Smith Attack on the Rebels at Bloomery Gap Sketch of General Lander Re-election of Jefferson Davis as President of the Southern Confederacy Occupation of Columbus, Kentucky, by Federal troops Desertion of Nashville by the Rebel Forces The Rebel Battering Ram Merrimac Incidents of the engagement Arrival of the ^Monitor in Hampton Roads Battle between The Monitor and the Merrimac. CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: Battle of Pea Ridge General Curtis Attack of the Rebels on the rear of the Federal Array Gallantry of General Sigel Continuance of the Battle of the second day Incidents of the contest It is renewed upon the third day Rout of the Rebels Sketches of Generals Curtis and Sigel President Lincoln's orders to the Federal Armies General McClellan's Address to the Army of the Potomac Sudden evacuation of Manassas by the Rebels Bombardment of Island Number Ten Operations of General Pope Artificial Channel cut through James Bayou General Pope attacks the Rebels at Tiptonville Capture of Island Number Ten Sketch of General Pope General Burnside attacks Newbern The Rebels surrender Consequences of this victory. CHAPTER NINETEEN: Movements of the Army of the Potomac The battle of Winchester Its results Sketch of General Shields Concentration of the Rebel troops near Corinth Approach of the Federal Army under General Grant Commencement of the Battle of Pittsburg Landing Attack and capture of General Prentiss's troops Efforts of General Sherman and McClernand Gradual repulse and retreat of the Federal Army Terrific scenes Interposition of the Federal Gunboats End of the first day's Battle Arrival of General Buell The second day's Conflict Incidents of this day The tide of victory is gradually reversed Ultimate Defeat of the Rebels Their retreat to Corinth Results of the Battle of Shiloh.

CHAPTER TWENTY: The Federal Army under General McClellan approach Yorktown Attack on detached Rebel Entrenchments Establishment of the Federal Camp, and erection of Federal Batteries Preparations for a conflict at Yorktown Operations of General Mitchell in Alabama Sketch of General Mitchell Events in Georgia Capture of Fort Pulaski Strength of the Rebel Works Incidents of the Bombardment of that Fort The conquest of New Orleans Federal armament under Commodore Farragut Bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip An engagement of six days Reduction of these Forts The Federal Fleet approach New Orleans The Rebel troops evacuate it The Summons to surrender New Orleans occupied by Federal troops- -Sketch of Commodore Farragut The Bombardment of Fort Macon Incidents of the assault Results of its capture by the Federal Troops.

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: Operations of General McClellan at Yorktown Battle of Lee's Mill Retreat of the Federal troops Evacuation of Yorktown by the Rebels Pursuit by the Federals Engagement between Cavalry near Williamsburg Second conflict near Williamsburg General Hooker's Division Federal victory Sketch of General Hancock Battle at West Point Rout of the Rebels Bombardment of Sewall's Point Expedition of General Wool against Norfolk Operations of General Fremont in the Mountain Department McDowell's Division at Fredericksburg Rout of Colonel Morgan in Tennessee Bombardment of Fort Wright commenced Engagement of the Federal Gunboats at Fort Darling on James River Advance of McClellan's Army towards Richmond It crosses the Chickahominy Decisive Engagement anticipated General Hunter's Abolition Proclamation President Lincoln's policy respecting it. CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO: The Corps d'armee of General Banks Reduction of its numbers The Rebels under Jackson attack the Advance at Front Royal Design of the Rebels to overpower Banks' Division The latter orders a general retreat toward Winchester Various Engagements on the route Battle at Middletown Action on the March to Winchester Battle at Newtown The Battle of Winchester Its results Continuance of the retreat to Williamsport Adventure of the Zouaves D'Afrique Federal losses during the Retreat Sketch of General Banks Attitude of the Federal and Rebel Armies at Corinth A great battle anticipated Commencement of the attack by General Halleck Its results Evacuation of Corinth by the Rebels Cause of this event An extraordinary spectacle Pursuit of the retreating foe A reconnoissance on the Chickahominy Skirmish at the Pines The Battle of Hanover Court House Destruction of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad Gallant Exploit of Lieutenant Davis. CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE: Approach of the Federal Army to Richmond The Corps of General Keys cross the Chickahominy Their exposed position The Battle of Seven Pines Position of the Federal troops Commencement of the Attack Disposition of troops made by General Casey Rout of Casey's Division General Couch's troops become engaged Desperate fighting Victory of the Rebels The Federals reinforced The Engagement of June first Incidents of this Battle Heroism of the Irish Regiments and of Sickles' Excelsior Brigade The victory of Fair Oaks Popular impatience for the occupation of Richmond Neetmok again General Fremont ordered to expel them They abandon Winchester Their retreat through Strasburg and Woodstock Battle of Cross Keys Battle of Port Republic Incidents of this Engagement Retreat of General Jackson toward Richmond Appointment of General Pope as Commander of the Department Withdrawal of General Fremont His military achievements His true renown. CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR: Prominence of tlie Mississippi Eiver in the events of the War Fleet of Gunboats commanded by Commodore Davis Evacuation of Fort Pillow The Naval Battle before Memphis Incidents of the Engagement Defeat of the Rebel Fleet General Negley's Expedition against Chattanooga Incidents of the Expedition General Morgan expels the Rebels from Cumberland Gap Disaster to the Federal Arms at James Island Incidents of the Engagement Ultimate defeat of the Federal troops Their Retreat Gallantry of the Rebel Commander Lamar Expedition of Colonel Fitch up the White River The Engagement at St. Charles Accident to the Mound City Cruelty of Captain Fry Capture of the Rebel Forts Excursion of Colonel Howard from Newbern to Swift Creek Bombardment of Vicksburg commenced Perilous passage of Commodore Farragut's Fleet. CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE: The Entrenchments of the Federal Army before Richmond Their extent Inactivity of the Federal Forces Concentration of Rebel troops in Richmond Glowing expectations of the loyal community Their disappointment The transfer of McClellan's base of supplies and operations to Harrison's Landing First attack of the Rebels on his troops at Mechanicsville Incidents of the Battle Commencement of the march toward the James River Battle of Gaines Mill Desperate fighting Heroism and valor on both sides Vicissitudes of the Struggle The Retreat continued toward James River Disposal of the sick and wounded Pertinacious pursuit by the Rebels Singular Caravan of wagons, cattle, and fugitives Battle of Peach Orchard Its results Battle at Savage's Station Resolute Assaults of the enemy Appalling scenes Important results The race to White Oak Swamp The Federal troops win the race. CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX: The Battle of White Oak Swamp Position and order of the Federal troops Temporary panic Desperate fighting Fortunate assistance of the Gunboats on James River Heroism and skill of General Heintzelman A general Bayonet Charge on the Rebels Its results First Engagement at Malvern Hill Incidents of the Fight The Irish Brigade Complete defeat of the Rebels The Federal Army removes to Harrison's Landing Results of the several Battles before Richmond Artillery Duel on the James River General Hooker sent to reconnoitre and occupy Malvern Hill The march thither Engagement with the enemy Their defeat Immense Reinforcements ordered from Richmond Return of the Federal troops to Harrison's Landing Final evacuation of their Camp by the Federal Army Its future Destination Federal losses during the Peninsula Campaign. CHAPTER ONE: Return of the Army of the Potomac from the Peninsula Appointment of General Halleck as Commander-in-Chief of Land Forces Operations of General Pope Messages of President Lincoln in Favor of Emancipation and Confiscation Engagement on the Mississippi with the Ram Arkansas Operations of John Morgan in Kentucky Morgan abandons Kentucky Additional Anti-slavery Message of Mr. Lincoln Attack made on the Arkansas by Colonel Ellet Defeat of the Queen of the West Creation of new Grades in the Federal Navy President Lincoln orders a Draft of Three Hundred Thousand Men. CHAPTER TWO: Designs of the Rebel Generals in Virginia Measures taken to counteract them Battle of Cedar or Slaughter Mountain Loss on both sides Heroism of General Bunks Subsequent Movements of the Rebels Designs of the Rebel Gen- erals Arrangements of General Pope The Rebels cross the Rappahannock Battle with the Troops of General Sigel Approach of Rebels toward Manassas The Great Battle at Manassas on August Twenty-ninth Engagement renewed on the Thirtieth Retreat of the Federal Army Battle near Centreville Death of Generals Kearney and Stevens Losses during the Campaign of General Pope in Virginia Sketches of Generals Kearney and Stevens A Court-Martial summoned at Washington to investigate Charges against General Porter Its Verdict. CHAPTER THREE: Battle of Baton Rouge Incidents of the Engagement Death of General Williams Assistance of the Federal Gunboats Final Defeat and Repulse of the Rebels The Rebel Ram Arkansas Its Destruction Indian Murders and Devastations in Minnesota Expedition of Colonel Ellet on the Mississippi and up the Yazoo Capture of the Transport Fair Play Apprehensions of an Invasion of Ohio by the Rebels Proclamation of Governor Tod Preparations made to receive the Enemy General Lewis Wallace Retreat of the Rebels Termination of the Popular Excitement Summary of Unimportant Events in August, 1862. CHAPTER FOUR: The Battle of South Mountain Heroism of General Hooker Victory of the Federal Army Retreat of the Rebels Death of General Reno Sketch of his Career Attack of the Rebels on Harper's Ferry Forces commanded by Colonel Miles The Great Battle of Antietam Position assigned Federal Forces Desperate Fighting of Hooker's Division Incidents of the Battle on the Right Wing Operations of Burnside on the Left Events in the Federal Centre Conclusion of the Engagement Retreat of the Rebel Army across the Potomac Sketches of Generals Hooker and Sumner Civil Aspects of the War President Lincoln's Proclamation of September 22d, 1862 Mr. Lincoln suspends the Habeas Corpus Act, on September 24th, 1862.

CHAPTER FIVE: The Battle at Iuka Victory of the Federal Troops Convention of the Governors of Loyal States at Altoona, Pennsylvania Their Address to President Lincoln His Reply Proposal of Peace discussed in the Confederate Congress Engagement at Corinth, Mississippi Sketch of Major-General Rosecrans Invasion of Pennsylvania by the Rebel General Stuart His Safe Return to Virginia Results of his Raid. CHAPTER SIX: The Federal Victory at Lavergne, Tennessee Inefficiency of General Buell His Removal from the Command of the Army of the Ohio Appointment of General Rosecrans as his Successor Fruits of General Bragg's Invasion of Kentucky Summary View of Minor Events which occurred in September and October, 1862.

CHAPTER SEVEN: Exploits of the Confederate Cruiser, the Alabama The Expedition sent by General Mitchell against the Charleston and Savannah Railroad Battles Their Results Return of the Expedition Occupation of Snicker's, Ashby's, and Thoroughfare Gaps by the Federal Troops Successful Reconnoissance of Captain Dahlgren to Fredericksburg, Virginia Abortive Attempt of the Rebels under Morgan and Forrest to capture Nashville, Tennessee Reconnoissance of General McPherson toward Holly Springs, Mississippi Approach of the Federal Army under Burnside to Fredericksburg Embarrassing Delay of Burnside's Operations. CHAPTER EIGHT: Assembling of the Federal Congress, December 1st, 1862 Annual Message of President Lincoln Official Report of the Secretary of the Treasury Skirmish at Franklin Capture of Union Troops at Hartsville Expedition of General Washburne from Helena to Coffeeville, Mississippi The Capture of the Steamship A riel by the Pirate Alabama Departure of the Banks' Expedition from New York Arrival of the Expedition at New Orleans General Banks succeeds General Butler. CHAPTER NINE: The Battle of Fredericksburg' The Laying of the Pontoon Bridges The Pontoniers driven away Doherty's description Renewal of the Attempt Its Second and Third Failure Bombardment of Fredericksburg The Bridges are constructed The Federal Troops cross the Rappahannock Commencement of the Engagement by General Franklin Incidents of the Battle Results of the Engagement Resignation of Mr. Seward Popular Censure General Burnside assumes the Responsibility The Cabinet remains Unchanged. CHAPTER TEN: The Expedition of Gen.

Foster from Newbern to Kingston and Gohlsboro Its Results President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation Its Provisions Feelings with which it was Regarded by Different Classes of the Community Its Influence upon the Future Events of the War. CHAPTER ELEVEN: Conclusion of the Year 1862 The Armies of Rosecrans and Bragg approach each other at Murfreesboro, Tennessee Beginning of the Battle End of the First Day's Combat The Engagement resumed Artillery Duel Furious Charge by the Rebels Heroism of Generals Negley and Davis The Rebels finally overpowered A General Charge on their Lines Its Result Complete Defeat of the Rebel Army Revolt of the Anderson Cavalry Its Alleged Causes The Loyal Three Hundred Field Order of General Rosecrans respecting the Anderson Cavalry. CHAPTER TWELVE: The Loss of the Federal Iron-Clad Monitor at Sea Her Peculiar Structure The Federal Army under General Sherman attack Vicksburg, Mississippi Landing of the Troops on the Yazoo The Attack commenced on the 27th of December The Assault resumed on the 28th The First Line of Works Carried Sherman orders a General Charge The Federals repulsed and defeated Terrible Slaughter Sherman superseded by McClernand.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: A Peculiar Feature of the History of this Civil War Gallantry of General Sullivan and the Indiana Troops Defeat of Forrest His Flight to the Tennessee River Attack of the Rebels on Galveston 1 heir Success Capture of the Harriet Lane Explosion of the Westfield. CHAPTER FOURTEEN: General Burnside resigns the Command of the Army of the Potomac He is succeeded by General Hooker Importance of the Question of Negro Troops in the Army Second Siege of Fort Donelson Its Result Triumph of Confederate Rams in the Harbor of Charleston The National Currency Bill The Conscription Law Destruction of the Rebel Steamer Nashville Attack on Fort McAllister Resolutions of Congress denouncing Foreign Intervention Remaining Military Events of February and March, 1863. CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Minor Military Operations during March, 1863 Desperate Cavalry Fight near the Rappahannock between Generals Averill, Stuart and Lee The Passage of the Federal Fleet past the Rebel Batteries at Port Hudson Co-operative Movements of General Banks Incidents of the Engagement at Port Hudson Report of the Congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War End of the Winter Campaign of 1862-3. CHAPTER SIXTEEN: Rise of the Anti-war Democrats, or the Peace Party Its Avowed Opinions and Opposition to the National Administration Suspense of the Writ of Habeas Corpus The Course of President Lincoln sustained by Congress and the Loyal Portion of the Nation as Constitutional, Wise and Patriotic Precedent of the British Parliament Objections of the Peace Party to the Financial Measures of the Government. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: The Preparations for Another Attack on Charleston Order of Battle prescribed by Admiral Dupont The Attack The Terrible Storm of Fire Gallantry of the Commanders of the Monitors The Keokuk riddled and sinking Three of the Monitors disabled Withdrawal of the Fleet Return to Fort Royal Expedition to Pascagoula The Battles on the Teche Destruction of Three Rebel Iron-Clads, and Capture of Two Thousand Prisoners Complete Rout of the Rebels. CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: Raids in both Armies Colonel Streight's Raid Colonel Grierson's Raid Colonel Clayton's Raid Lieutenant Colonel Jenkins' Fight with Carter's Texas Brigade.

CHAPTER NINETEEN: The Siege of Washington, North Carolina Hooker's Management of the Army of the Potomac Jackson's Attack on the Right Wing Panic in the Eleventh Corps Their Flight The Advance of the Rebels checked by Berry's Division Battle of the Wilderness J ackson mortally wounded Battle of Chancellorsville Movements of Sedgwick's Corps Battle of Marye's Hill Battle of Salem Heights Battle of Banks's Ford Sedgwick's Corps cross the Ford General Hooker calls a Council of War Recrosses the Rappahannock Review of the Campaign. CHAPTER TWENTY: Stoneman's Expedition Its Adventures Colonel Kilpatrick's Adventures Lee's Determination to invade Pennsylvania Pleasonton sent to attack Stuart's Cavalry Success of his Attack Movement of Hooker's Army The Rebel Army cross the Potomac Hooker's Follow Hooker relieved of the Command Meade appointed his Successor. CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: Battle of Gettysburg Beginning of the Battle Death of General Reynolds Retreat of the First and Eleventh Corps to Cemetery Hill Reinforcements of the Union Army Position of the two Armies on the morning of July 2d Opening of the Second Day's Battle The Ninth Massachusetts Battery The Charge of the Pennsylvania Reserves The Third Day's Battle Terrible Artillery Duel on the Left Centre Assault by Pickett's Division Terrible Slaughter Longstreet's Attack on Round Top This too repulsed Retreat of the Rebels The Losses on both sides.

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO: General Grant takes Command in person of the Army for the Reduction of Vicksburg His Canal Projects He resolves to attack from below The Running of the Batteries Attack on Grand Gulf Repulse of the Gunboats They run past the batteries Landing at Bruinsburg Battle of Sharper's Plantation, and Port Gibson Evacuation of Grand Gulf Skirmish at Fourteen-Mile Creek Battle at Raymond Capture of Jackson, Mississippi, and Destruction of Rebel Property there March of the Army Westward Battle of Champion Hill Battle of Black River Bridge Vicksburg invested Assaults on the Nineteenth and Twenty-second of May Siege of the City Its Capitulation on the Fourth of July Terms of the Surrender The Results of the Campaign Rebel and Union Losses Sherman's Pursuit of Johnston Capture of Jackson and Defeat of the Rebels General Ransom's Expedition to Natchez General Herron's Capture of Yazoo City Operations of the Gunboats on the Tributaries of the Mississippi Battle of Milliken's Bend Bravery of the Colored Troops Attack on Lake Providence. CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE: The Investment of Port Hudson Battle Fought by General Augur The Arrival of Additional Forces The Assault of the 27th of May The Brilliant Attack of General Weitzel's Division Partial Success of the Assault The Assault of the 14th of June Its Failure The Closeness of the Siege Sufferings of the Garrison Their Surrender The Rebel Attacks on Brashear City and Terrebonne Inhuman Massacre of Infirm Contrabands and Women and Children The Murder of Negroes at St. Martinsville The Attack of the Rebels on Helena, Arkansas Their Signal Defeat Review of the Progress of the War during the Eleven Months included in this Volume The Beginning of the End.

CHAPTER ONE: The Army of the Potomac at rest The overthrow of the Rebel power in Arkansas The Guerrillas and Bushwhackers of Arkansas and the Indian Territory Quantrel and his band The sacking of Lawrence Attempt to murder General Blunt Cabell, Marmaduke, Shelby, and Coffey, make a raid into Missouri, and are defeated and routed Morgan's raid into Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio His capture and imprisonment His escape Sketch of his life His death The riots of the summer of 1863 The great riot in New York Its causes and objects The reign of terror The mob subdued The loss of life and property by it. CHAPTER TWO: Department of the South Capture of the Atlanta General Gillmore succeeds Hunter, and Dahlgren, Du Pont Gillmore's strategic plan Reasons for believing it an error Folly Island Gillmore's Batteries there Capture of the southern portion of Morris Island Feints in other directions The first assault on Wagner Repulse Erection of Batteries Bombardment and second assault A costly failure The siege pressed Other Batteries erected The Swamp Angel located Bombardment of Fort Sumter Its substantial reduction Gillmore demands the surrender of Fort Sumter and the Forts on Morris Island, and threatens to bombard Charleston in case of refusal Beauregard replies haughtily and insolently Gillmore's rejoinder The approaches to Fort Wagner completed The garrisons of Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg evacuate those Works Gillmore's despatch announcing the capture Other events in the Department Sketch of General Gillmore Sketch of Adiniral Dahlgren. CHAPTER THREE: The Department of the Cumberland Army of the Cumberland in motion The strength and position of the two Armies Topography of the country of Middle Tennessee General Rosecrans' tactics The movement by the left flank Its complete success Manchester, Decherd, Cowan, Shelbyville, and Tullahoina taken Bragg's Army driven eastward to University and Sweden's Cove, and thence to Chattanooga The movement of the Union Army toward Chattanooga Rosecrans determines to outflank Bragg's position Route of the several Corps Peril of McCook's Corps The concentration of troops at McLamore's Cove Preparations for Battle The first day of the Battle of Chickamauga The second day The line broken and seven Brigades cut off General Rosecrans at Chattanooga General Thomas fights till sunset and repulses the enemy Sketch of General Thomas Results of the Battle McCook and Crittenden relieved, and their Corps consolidated General Thomas succeeds General Rosecrans Perilous condition of the Army General Grant put in command of the Grand Military Division of the Mississippi Reinforcements ordered up. CHAPTER FOUR: Sketch of General Grant He is appointed to the command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, and arrives at Chattanooga The capture of Brown's Ferry, Movements of Hooker's command Battle of Wauhatchie The results gained Attempts of the Rebels to break Grant's communications Bragg sends Longstreet's Corps to besiege Knoxville General Grant's instructions to General Burnside Fighting and retreating Longstreet arrives before Knoxville and invests it Topography of the Chattanooga Valley and its surroundings Bragg's Message Grant's plan for the defeat of his Army The capture of the Rebel Batteries on Bald Knobs Sherman's movements The pontoon bridges The Bastion taken Hooker's attack on the Rebel left wing on Lookout Mountain The surprise The Battle above the Clouds The fighting on the east side of Lookout Evacuation of their positions by the Rebels Hooker follows them to Mission Ridge Sherman's persistent and repeated attacks upon Fort Buckner Repulse of his attacking columns Their object gained, in drawing the Rebel troops from Fort Bragg The assault on the centre by the Fourth Corps Difficulties of the attack Capture of the Crest and Fort Bragg Flight of the enemy Pursuit to Ringgold Fight at Ringgold Gap Sherman marches to Knoxville and raises the siege Battle of Bean's Station Results of the Chattanooga Campaign General Grant's congratulatory order General Halleck's estimate of the Campaign.

CHAPTER FIVE: Department of the Northwest Indian troubles in Minnesota Death of Little Crow General Sibley's expedition against the Indians He defeats, pursues, and routs them General Sully's Battle at Whitestone Hill Escape of the Indians General Conner's Battle with the Indians Department of West Virginia General Averell's raid into Southwestern Virginia His capture at Salem and destruction of Commissary and Quartermasters' stores His escape from the six Generals Sketch of General Averell Other operations in West Virginia Army of the Potomac Lee's flanking movement Its extent General Meade's excessive caution The Cavalry Battle at Brandy Station General Warren's Battle with Hill's Corps at Bristow Station Hill repulsed Custer's attack on Stuart's Cavalry Lee's return to the Rapidan Imboden's attack on Charlestown, Virginia Lee removes to the Rappahannock and fortifies his position Meade drives him back, taking over two thousand prisoners Sedgwick's assault at Rappahannock Station Its success The left wing at Kelly's Ford and Brandy Station Meade's coup-de-main His plans unmasked His withdrawal across the Rapidan Results. CHAPTER SIX: The Anaconda Policy Reasons why it could not succeed in crushing the Rebellion Department of the GulfThe occupation of Texas determined upon The reasons assigned for it General Franklin ordered to Louisiana Expedition of Generals Banks and Franklin to Texas The great preparations made for it The troops and their commanders The disastrous attack on Sabine Pass and City Advance of the Army to Vermillionville The coast expedition to Texas Reconstruction in Louisiana The starting of the advance of the Grand Army Capture of Simmsport, Bayou Glace, and Fort de Russy Alexandria captured and occupied Battles of Teachoes and Cane River The Army too much scattered Arrival at Grand Ecore The advance toward Mansfield The Battle of Mansfield Rout and panic Battle of Pleasant Hill The retreat down the Red River Grand Ecore Jumping the sand-bars Alexandria The Rapids Colonel Bailey's Dams Escape of the Gunboats Rear Admiral Porter's Report The retreat to Simmsport and Morganzia General Steele's retreat to Little Rock General Canby in command of the Trans Mississippi Division Department of the South Political aspirations of Florida Unionists Their pleas for an expedition into Northern Florida The expedition ordered The plan General Seymour at its head Delays and disasters Battle of Olustee Retreat of the Union forces Losses End of the Anaconda Policy. CHAPTER SEVEN: Sherman's Meridian expedition The co-operative movements and their failure The movable column Advance into the enemy's country Return General Grant promoted to the Lieutenant Generalship, and Sherman appointed to command the Military Division of the Mississippi Sketch of Sherman Other changes in commands Reorganization of the Eastern and Western Armies Improvement in discipline and morale Forrest and Chalmers set out on an expedition for plunder and murder Attack on Union City On Paducah The massacre at Fort Pillow Atrocity of the conduct of the Rebels The Rebel Government promote Forrest and Chalmers for it Buford's demand for the surrender of Columbus, Kentucky Forrest's retreat.

CHAPTER EIGHT: Preparations for the advance General Grant's strategy Simultaneous movement The numbers in the opposing Armies Situation of the subordinate Armies of the Union and their numbers General Butler's advance The feint on York River Ascent of the James to City Point and Bermuda Hundred The advance on Fort Darling The troops driven back Attack of the Rebels on Bermuda Hundred They are repulsed Departure of the Eighteenth Corps The attack on Petersburg Its partial failure Army of the Potomac crossing the Rapidan The Battles of May 5th and 6th Lee's change of position Death of Wadsworth Sketch of Wadsworth Fighting of May 7th and 8th Partial lull on the 9th Death of General Sedgwick Desperate fighting on the 10th The results still indecisive Quiet on the next day General Grant's despatch Fighting it out on that line The terrible Battle of the 12th The charge of the Second Corps Desperate fighting Wilcox's Division forced back Success turning to the Union side Losses of the eight days on the Union side Losses on the Rebel side Impossibility of movements during the storm Sketch of General Sedgwick. CHAPTER NINE: Continuation of Grant's campaign Battles near Spottsylvania Reinforcements The Battle of the 18th of May The repulse Another flank movement to the North Anna, and beyond Ewell's raid upon the Union rear He is repulsed with loss Fighting near the North Anna Strength of the Rebel position Another flank movement Recrossing the North Anna March to Hanover towu Cavalry engagement on Tolopatomoy Creek Battle of Tolopatomoy Creek, or Shady Grove Church Topography of the country north of the Chickahominy Position of Lee's Army Cavalry Battle for the possession of Cold Harbor The Battle of Cold Harbor Desperate fighting of the Sixth and Eighteenth Corps Fighting on other parts of the line The Battle of the Chickahominy Indecisive results of the gallant and desperate fighting The opposing lines very near each other Losses of both sides since the Battles of the Wilderness Sketch of General Hancock Sheridan's first raid Richmond threatened His force surrounded at the Chickahominy Rebuilding Meadow Bridge Gallant charge on the enemy His escape His second raid The Battles of Trevilian Station Sheridan withdraws, after punishing the enemy severely, and rejoins the Army of the Potomac south of the James River. CHAPTER TEN: The troops in West Virginia Crook and Averell defeat the Rebels on New River The Battle of New Market Sigel defeated He is relieved of command, and sent to Martinsburg as post commandant General Hunter succeeds him Battle near Mount Crawford The Rebels defeated, and their general killed Hunter captures Staunton and Lexington, and burns the Lexington Military Institute, and Governor Letcher's house, but fails to join Sheridan, and is compelled by Early to fall back from Lynchburg into the Kanawha Valley, after a losing fight Early takes advantage of this to descend the Shenandoah Valley to the Potomac Hunters efforts to retrieve his blunder Army of the Potomac Crossing the James Cavalry reconnoissance to Malvern Hill The attack on Petersburg Partial success Butler cuts the railroad The assaults of the Second and Ninth Corps on the defences of Petersburg Incomplete success The Rebels retire to their inner line of defences Failure of the attempt to carry these The attacks on the Weldon Railroad The disastrous repulse of June 22d The position nearly regained, but no advance made Wilson's and Kautz's raid on the Weldon and Southside Railroads Great destruction of railroad tracks and property Heavy losses of the expedition in its return march Early's foray into Maryland and Pennsylvania Terror of the inhabitants The Battle of Monocacy Wallace defeated The Sixth and Nineteenth Corps ordered into Maryland General Ord succeeds General Wallace Railroads broken up and trains captured by the Rebels Washington threatened Rebels defeated by General Augur Their retreat across the Potomac Fighting at Snicker's and Ashby's Gaps Averell's Battle near Winchester Defeat of the RebelsBattle of Winchester, July 24th Crook defeated, and Mulligan killed Sketch of Mulligan The panic in Maryland and Pennsylvania renewed Absurd reports Burning of Chambersburg Mosby's little raid Governor Curtin calls a special session of the Legislature Thirty thousand militia called out Early's retreat Fighting near Cumberland, Maryland Rebels defeated by Averell at Moorefield, Virginia The mine at Petersburg Demonstration on the enemy's left Fight at Deep Bottom Explosion of the mine Fatal blundering Repulse and heavy loss. CHAPTER ELEVEN: Sherman's Atlanta campaign Sherman's preparations The force under his command, and the several Armies composing it, The Army of the enemy Its position and commander Sketch of Johnston The demonstration on Rocky Faced Ridge, and Battles there Flanking movement through Snake Creek Gap on Resaca Battles at Resaca Flanking movement toward Kingston Capture of Rome Crossing the Etowah Movement toward Dallas Battles of New Hope Church and Dallas Sherman moves to the left Occupation of Allatoona Pass, and Big Shanty The Pass made a secondary base of supplies The enemy driven from Pine and Lost Mountains The affair of "the Kulp House"' Assault on the enemy on Kenesaw Mountain Repulse Flanking again The Rebels compelled to fall back to the Chattahoochie Occupation of Marietta The Union Army cross the Chattahoochie Burning of Roswell factories. CHAPTER TWELVE: Rousseau's expedition to Opelika, and the West Point and Mongomery Railroad The position of the Union Army First Battle of Peach Tree Creek, July 20th Second Battle of Peach Tree Creek, July 22d Death of McPherson Biographical sketch of General McPherson Garrard's expedition to Covington Stoneman and McCook undertake cavalry expeditions Failure of Stoneman Partial success of McCook Battle of July 28th before Atlanta Siege of Atlanta Its strength, Tenacity of Hood in holding the railroad lines Sherman extends his line to the right, but Hood holds the railroad Bombardment of Atlanta Wheeler's raid to cut Sherman's communication Sherman sends Kilpatrick to cut the railroad below Atlanta Partial success Sherman raises the siege, and sends Williams back to the Chattahoochie, while the main Army moves toward Jonesboro Battles near Jonesboro Hardee defeated and driven southward Hood evacuates Atlanta The Union Army take possession of the city Removal of the citizens from the city Results of the campaign.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: The Department of North Carolina and Southeast Virginia Capture of the Underwriter Attack on Newbern Attack on Plymouth, North Carolina Desperate fighting by the garrison of the Fort Capture of Plymouth The Albemarle's first appearance She drives the Union Gunboats from the river The Battle between the Albemarle and the Sassacus Daring conduct of Commander Roe The Albemarle crippled Explosion of the boiler of the Sassacus The heroism of the crew The Sassacus disabled Retreat of the Albemarle Her subsequent fate Daring exploit of Lieutenant Cushing Morgan's last raid into Kentucky Capture of Cynthiana, and surrender of General Hobson's troops Defeat of Morgan by General Burbridge The gunboat disaster The Rebel trap Retreat of Sturgis The train in a slough Complete rout and disorder, and loss of train and guns Bravery of the negro troops Forrest's raid on Memphis The Forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay Farragut's anxiety for their capture The attack on the Forts The Battle with the ram Tennessee Her surrender Results of the Battle Surrender of the Forts Sketch of Commander Craven Sketch of Farragut. CHAPTER FOURTEEN: The Middle Military Division organized, and General Sheridan appointed its commander Organization of the new Army of the Shenandoah Sheridan concentrates his troops on the line of the Potomac Advancing and retreating "Harper's Weekly" Early's misconception of Sheridan's character His movement to Berryville The cavalry fight at Darkesville The Battle of Opequan Creek, or Winchester Early " sent whirling" up the Valley Battle of Fisher's Hill Early again defeated and routed " Settling a new Cavalry General" Kosser's defeat Early defeated again at Little North Mountain, on the 12th of October Sheridan visits Washington Early creeps up on the left flank of the Union Army The Union troops defeated badly, and driven to Middletown Sheridan comes up, makes the fugitives "face the other way, " reorganizes the Army, attacks, defeats, and routs Early, and sends him once more " whirling" up the Valley, with the loss of his artillery, wagons, etc. CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Political parties, and their influence during the War " The era of good feeling" Its speedy termination Fernando Wood's somersaults The professions of the Pro-Slavery Democratic leaders Their desire for a " more vigorous prosecution of the War" " The great unready" Opposition to emancipation nominally relinquished The suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act, and arbitrary arrests The conscription Their objections to it Their hostility to the Financial Policy of the Government Secret organizations opposed to the Government The Peace Party and its leader Sketch of Vallandigham His treasonable address and his arrest Judge Leavitt's refusal to grant a Writ of Habeas Corpus, and his opinion of treasonable utterances Vallandigham's trial and sentence The President commutes it to transportation beyond the Union lines Protest of the Albany Committee The President's reply Protest of the Columbus Committee The President's propositions The object of these demonstrations Vallandigham nominated for Governor and defeated His escape to Canada and return to Ohio Character and conduct of his associates in Canada He attends the Chicago Convention The proceedings of this Convention Its platform Its nominees General McClellan's letter of acceptance He accepts the nomination, but repudiates the platform, while Mr. Pendleton accepts both Utter defeat of the Peace Party at the November election Efforts at Negotiations for Peace The Jacques and Gilmore mission A.

Stephens' application to go to Washington in a Rebel War Steamer The Greeley and Sanders correspondence " To whom it may concern" The pretended indignation of Clay and Holcombe Subsequent revelations of their character and purposes Lee's announcement to Jeff. Blair's mission Rebel Commissioners appointed Mr. Lincoln meet them The conference at Hampton Roads The demands of Davis Impossibility of conceding them Failure of the conference. Their Iron-clads Fate of their vessels The Anglo Rebel Privateers Their names and character The attempts to build armored ships for the Rebels in England and France Their failureThe history of the Alabama Her perfidious attack on the Hatteras, She enters the Port of Cherbourg, and finding escape without a fight impossible, her commander challenges the Kearsarge to a Battle The comparative size, armament, and crews of the two vessels, and their means of resistance Captain Semmes's preparations The Deerhound The Battle Despicable conduct of the owner of the Deerhound Semmes receives ovations Rage of the English at the sinking of the Alabama Causes of it The capture of the Georgia History of the Florida Her capture Commander Collins censurable for seizing her in a Neutral Port Action of the United States Government Brazil satisfied Lieutenant Reed's adventures as a Pirate Capturing fishing smacks and coasters Cutting out the Cushing Capture of the Lieutenant and his crew The seizure of the Chesapeake Her recapture Career of the Tallahassee, the Olustee, and the Chickamauga The Shenandoah and her piracies She comes to Liverpool and delivers herself up to the British Government Course adopted by that Government The career of the Stonewall or Olinde Her surrender to the Spanish Government, and final transfer to the United States Losses of the Mercantile Marine by the Rebel cruisers. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: Disturbances in Missouri The small number of troops in the Department General Rosecrans in command there Price thinks the opportunity favorable for another invasion of Missouri Marmaduke sent to test its feasibility He is repulsed and driven back toward Arkansas Price's expedition in September The number of his troops The Union force collected to oppose him The Battle of Pilot Knob Fight at Harrison's Station Skilful management of General Ewing Rolla securely garrisoned General Pleasonton takes command of the cavalry Condition of St.

Louis and Jefferson City Price makes a fatal delay He threatens Jefferson City, but finding it too strongly defended turns aside to Booneville Sanborn follows and harasses him Pleasonton joins in the pursuit The Battles of the Big Blue Little Osage Crossing, and Marais des Cygnes Price completely routed He is defeated once more at Newtonia Results Indian troubles on the Frontier The league among the tribes of the Sioux Nation General Pope's ideas of the best method of breaking their power General Sully sent with a large cavalry force to attack them, and Posts established along the Frontier His campaign The Battle near the Little Missouri The defeat and flight of the Indians Sally falls back to his trains and pursues them to the Bad Lands Description of the Bad Lands He attacks and defeats the Indians again They are completely scattered and broken General Pope's plans for Peace with them in future The massacre of the Cheyennes by Colonel Chivington Details of the surprise and slaughter Investigation by the Committee on the Conduct of the War Chivington ordered arrested Rebel Plots against the citizens of the Northern States The scheme for the release of the Johnson's Island prisoners, and the burning of Buffalo, Cleveland, etc. How baffled Blackburn's plan for disseminating Yellow Fever and Small Pox John T. Beall's raid upon Lake Steamers His capture, trial, and execution The raid on St.

Albans Arrest and discharge of the robbers The Plot for releasing the prisoners and destroying Chicago How discovered Attempt to burn the Hotels in New York Arrest, trial, and execution of Kennedy. CHAPTER NINETEEN: The Nashville Campaign Sherman's resolve Davis's boast Hood tries to fulfill it The offer to give Hood his rations Movements of General Thomas's command The Fourth and Twenty third Corps assigned to General Thomas Sherman's order His instructions A part of Hood's force crosses the Tennessee The number of Hood's troops Effective force of Thomas Cheatham's Corps crosses the Tennessee Forrest's raid on Johnsonville Schofield passes through Johnsonville to Pulaski Hood advances on Pulaski Schofield's and Thomas's measures Falling back to Columbia Calling in the garrisons The crossing of Duck River Hood attempts to flank Schofield at Spring Hill, but fails to do so Causes of the failure The race for Franklin Schofield wins The importance of the stake Schofield keeps the Rebels at bay till his men have thrown up temporary defences Hood's address to his troops His plan Its partial success Heroism of General Stanley Results of the Battle Sketch of General Stanley Schofield falls back to Nashville, and Milroy to Murfreesboro Thomas's reinforcements come up Position of the two Armies Hood's blunder The expedition against Murfreesboro Its failure Thomas prepares to attack Hood's left, at the same time demonstrating upon his right The Battle of Nashville First day Results Hood's condition and hopes Second day Disposition of the troops Cavalry attack on the rear The general advance The assault Repulse Advancing again The enemy's lines broken, and he compelled to fly in the utmost disorder The retreat The pursuit Its relentless character Results Gallant conduct of Colonel Palmer The campaign in East Tennessee and Western Virginia Battles of Kingsport, Abington and Marion Capture of Wytheville and Saltville Burbridge's return to Kentucky.

CHAPTER TWENTY: The Army of the Potomac and the Army of the James Grant strikes the Weldon Railroad Sharp fighting After a desperate engagement Reams's Station falls into the hands of the enemy Fort, or Battery Harrison captured Battle of Chaffin's Farm Capture of Fort McRae Battle of Peebles' Farm Kautz's Cavalry defeated Attempt to turn the right flank of the Union Army It fails Repulse of the Union troops The Battle of Hatcher's Run Mahone interposes between the Second and Fifth Corps Failure of the entire movement The first expedition against Fort Fisher General Butler's management The powder-boat General Butler's debarkation, reconnoissance, and re embarkation He is relieved of his command The second expedition, under command of General Terry Furious bombardment The Fort carried Sketch of General Terry Sketch of Admiral Porter. CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE: The Goldsboro campaign Sherman determines to march through the Carolinas Movement of the Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps to Hilton Head Capture of Pocotaligo Bridge Movement of the left wing Delayed by floods Grover's Division garrisons Savannah Savannah and its defences transferred to Major General Foster The Rebels adopt the Salkahatchie as their defensive line Movements of the Army of the Tennessee Slow progress of the left wing The advance upon Orangeburg Evacuation of Charleston The approach to Columbia Surrender of the City Destructive fire The advance to Winnsboro Kilpatrick's movements The speculations of the Rebels as to Sherman's objective They compel Davis to give Johnston the command of their Armies in North and South Carolina Crossing the Wateree The approach to, and capture of, Cheraw Advance on Fayetteville, N. Hardee abandons it The Battle of Solomon's Grove Kilpatrick surprised, but rallies and defeats the enemy Sherman's letter to the Lieutenant General His correspondence with Wheeler and Wade Hampton Pusillanimity and cowardice of South Carolina The horrors of War dealt out to her in full measure North Carolina spared The last stage of the campaign Hardee's attack on the left wing at Averysboro The Battle of Bentonville The advance to Goldsboro_Mowers' daring flank movement Goldsboro reached, and the Army resting and receiving supplies General Sherman's summing up of results. CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO: Surrender of Rebel Fortifications at the entrance to Wilmington Harbor General Schofield put in command of the Department of North Carolina The advance upon Fort Anderson The Rebels abandon the Fort The operations of the Fleet General Cox crosses Town Creek, bombards Eagle Island Crosses Brunswick River, and drives the enemy out of Wilmington Results The movement on Kinston and GoldsboroBattle at Southwest Creek Capture of Union troops Kinston evacuated, and occupied by Schofield General Terry moves from Wilmington to Goldsboro General Grant determines to cut Lee's communications on the Northwest Sheridan's raid on Lynchburg General Grant's instructions to Generals Meade, Ord, and Sheridan Gordon's attack upon Fort Stedman He captures the Fort, but it is retaken General Meade's Congratulatory Order The general advance upon Lee's lines General Grant's instructions to General Sheridan General Warren's repulse His Corps put under Sheridan's command Sheridan's Battle at Dinwiddie Court House The Battle of Five Forks Attack on the Fortifications of. Petersburg Petersburg and Richmond evacuated Pursuit of Lee Battles of Jetersville, Farmville, High Bridge, Deatonsville, and Appomatox Station Correspondence between Grant and Leo Surrender of Lee Sketch of General Lee.

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE: The Assassination of the President The circumstances Attempt to murder other High Officers of the Government Arrest and punishment of the Assassins Sketch of Lincoln The stability of the Government demonstrated The advance of Sherman to Smithfield and Raleigh Dispositions made to compel Johnston's surrender Johnston asks an interview The memorandum drawn up and sent to Washington Its terms Its rejection by the Cabinet General Grant bears the news, and is authorized to take command Sherman's prompt action Johnston surrenders on the same terms as Lee Sherman marches his Army to Richmond and Washington Disbanding of the forces Stoneman's expedition Canby's siege and capture of Mobile Surrender of the Rebel Fleet General Dick Taylor's surrender Wilson's Cavalry expedition Capture of Montevallo and Randolph Croxton's separate expedition The Battle and capture of Selma Capture of Montgomery, Wetumpka, Ala. Battle at West Point, Ga. Its capture La Grange, Griffin, and Forsyth captured Sherman's Armistice Capture of Macon Detention at Macon Croxton's return to the Main Army His achievements The surrender of all the Rebel troops East of the Chattahoochie Distribution of troops Pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis The poor old mother and her boots Disposition made of the prisoner Results of Wilson's campaign Kirby Smith's surrender Sheridan on the Rio Grande. CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR: Finances of the War Unpromising state of affairs when Mr.

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